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Opinion

The Mutant Problem

Published: July 19, 2015


 

Pietro

 

"When you have skeletons this big, you try to bury it as deeply as possible. Of course, the same damn skeletons have such a stink that sooner or later, it comes out."

The hunt for the Brotherhood of Mutants pulled a lot of ugly skeletons from the woodwork. For Pietro and his sister, Wanda, it hit painfully close to a past they would have preferred remain a secret. They're the children of Magneto, the leader of the mutant terrorist group, the Brotherhood.

"Every second of coverage makes me angry," said Pietro. "We were in high school when he officially became Magneto but he'd abandoned us for his goddamned quest long before that. Sometimes I think he only had kids so he could have someone to pass this twisted legacy to."

Did Magneto raise them under his philosophy?

"He tried. Fortunately he had a lot of less radical colleagues. So it wasn't all brainwashing from birth." He flicked his cigarette and studied the tip intensely. "I changed my name legally as soon as I could but I guess no one's safe from TMZ."

He tried to make it a joke by smiling. He couldn't quite do it.

Introduction: The Mutant Problem

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