Skip to article

Opinion

The Mutant Problem

Published: July 19, 2015


 

Leech

 

Leech came with Teresa. He's no stranger to experiments. For years, he lived isolated in a pharmaceutical lab. Worthington Klaxo-Bryers claimed to only recruit volunteers for their drug testing and research departments. They fed and housed Leech, a street kid starting to experiment with drugs. In exchange, they drew his blood serum in an attempt to create a "cure" for mutation.

"I guess it was okay there," he said. "I had a lot of games. And everything was really clean."

He flinches when you get too close.

"I like being in gardens. There's a lot of smells. And the grass is... there's so much color. And sound. Teresa gives me a lot of sound."

Teresa smiled in his direction. He smiled back but it looked uncomfortable.

"I'm going to stay outside all the time."

 

Introduction: The Mutant Problem

Click the images below for more in this article

   
Cast &
Credits

Inside NYTimes.com

N.Y. / Region
Fantastic Couple Renews Their Vows
Fantastic Couple Renew Their Vows
Opinion
If Marijuana Is Legal, Will Addiction Rise?
If Marijuana Is Legal, Will Addiction Rise?
Arts
Caravaggio at the Met
Caravaggio at the Met
Opinion

The Mutant Problem

As a starving student, Peter Parker took a job photographing "the mutant problem." More than ten years later, his definition of "the problem" has changed.

U.S.
Daredevil Sightings Increase
Daredevil Sightings Increase
World
The Hulk Leaves Descrution in Its Wake
The Hulk Leaves Destruction in Its Wake